three mushrooms lined in a row

Mushrooms have thousands of years of therapeutic use in traditional cultures; however, today, the literature is starting to emerge on both their mechanisms and the full range of applications. While much of the research has focused on their (a) antioxidant content; (b) ability to regulate the immune system; and (c) ability to combat cancer; they may also play roles in (d) reducing inflammation; (e) combating metabolic syndrome, including diabetes, obesity and cardiovascular disease; (f) combating pathogenic bacteria, viruses, parasites, and other fungi; (g) improving mood, cognitive function and reducing neurodegeneration; and (h) improving organ function.

The first three benefits are focused on because most medicinal mushrooms are rich sources of antioxidants and have the immunomodulatory ability. However, the ability of specific mushrooms to reduce inflammation and improve detoxification pathways which, in conjunction with the former effects, can have broad-reaching systemic health benefits. Rather than taking them in isolation, we can optimize a synergistic effect to help achieve optimal health by combining them.

However, we might encounter a common problem because their chitinous cell walls impede bioavailability or adequate absorption of their various bioactive compounds. Because of this issue, particular extraction methods are essential. For example, by utilizing a triple extraction method, the full spectrum can be isolated for maximum benefit.

Keep reading to learn the key benefits of various medicinal mushrooms and extraction methods to utilize these mushrooms to their fullest potential.

 

If you want to enter the realm of using mushrooms for their therapeutic effects, we have the appropriate product for you. Our organic therapeutic mushroom powders are some of the best on the market.

 

Due to our extraction methods, these mushrooms will have improved bioavailability, thus, improved benefits.

 

Benefits of Individual Medicinal Mushrooms

 

mushroom in a forest opening

 

Medicinal mushrooms are more than a low-calorie nutrient supplier. They also house many health benefits that could help remedy existing ailments and prevent new problems from arising.

Throughout this list, each point will cover the proven benefits of over ten mushroom types. That way, we have a better understanding of why they play an essential role in human health.

 

Related: Who Is Edible Alchemy?

 

Reishi (Ganoderma lucidum)

The Reishi mushroom is native to hot and humid areas of Asia. Other than this mushroom’s positive effects on testosterone, Reishi also has these benefits:

  • Antidiabetic
  • Anti-inflammatory
  • Antimicrobial & antiviral
  • Antioxidant
  • Anxiolytic
  • Hepatoprotective
  • Cardioprotective
  • Immunomodulatory
  • Improves microbiome
  • Mood enhancing
  • Reduces fatigue

 

Cordyceps (Ophiocordyceps sinensis)

A type of fungus commonly found on caterpillars in mountainous regions of China. A multitude of health benefits is provided by cordyceps, including:

  • Antidiabetic
  • Anti-inflammatory
  • Antioxidant
  • Athletic Performance
  • Hepatoprotective
  • Immunomodulatory
  • Promotes respiratory function

 

Related: Organic Cordyceps Extracted Mushroom Tinctures

 

Chaga (Inonotus obliquus)

For centuries, Chaga mushrooms have been utilized as a traditional medicine to boost overall health and immune systems. This mushroom also offers the following benefits:

  • Antidiabetic
  • Anti-inflammatory
  • Antioxidant
  • Athletic Performance
  • Cardioprotective
  • Immunomodulatory

 

Mesima (Phellinus linteus)

Also known as the Black Hoof Mushroom, Meisma was used in teas by past Chinese and Japanese royalty. Now it is used to potentially remedy ailments with the following benefits:

  • Anti-inflammatory
  • Antioxidant
  • Immunomodulatory

 

Lion's Mane (Hericium erinaceus)

Lion’s Manes are large and white mushrooms packed with various benefits like:

  • Antidiabetic
  • Anti-inflammatory 
  • Antioxidant
  • Cognitive enhancement
  • Immunomodulatory
  • Neuroprotective

 

Turkey Tail (Trametes versicolor)

For centuries, many have used this mushroom to treat a myriad of conditions naturally. Some of the Turkey Tail’s benefits and conditions that it treats include:

  • Anti-carcinogenic 
  • Anti-inflammatory 
  • Antimicrobial & antiviral
  • Antioxidant
  • Immunomodulatory
  • Improves microbiome

 

Maitake (Grifola frondosa)

Dancing mushrooms, or Maitake, have many positive health effects, including:

  • Antidiabetic
  • Anti-inflammatory 
  • Antioxidant
  • Immunomodulatory

 

Shiitake (Lentinula edodes)

These popular mushrooms are native to East Asia. Shiitake mushrooms are said to have many health benefits, including:

  • Antimicrobial & antiviral
  • Antioxidant
  • Cardioprotective
  • Cognitive enhancement
  • Immunomodulatory
  • Weight regulation

 

Agaricus Blazei (Agaricus subrufescens)

The Agracius Blazei is rich in immunomodulating polysaccharides (β-glucans). According to an investigation by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), these mushrooms treat inflammatory bowel diseases in patients in addition to other areas like:

  • Antidiabetic
  • Antimicrobial & antiviral
  • Anti-inflammatory
  • Antioxidant
  • Immunomodulatory

 

Poria (Wolfiporia extensa)

Poria mushrooms contain chemicals that may reduce swelling, enhance immunity, and prevent cancer. Among the additional benefits are:

  • Anti-inflammatory
  • Antioxidant
  • Hepatoprotective
  • Immunomodulatory
  • Renoprotective

 

Agarikon (Laricifomes officinalis)

There are several benefits associated with this fungus:

  • Antimicrobial & antiviral
  • Anti-inflammatory
  • Immunomodulatory
  • Promotes respiratory function

 

Suehirotake (Schizophyllum commune)

The Split-Fold Mushroom (Suehirotake) has a polysaccharide structure, which stimulates T cells. Some of this mushroom’s demonstrated benefits include:

  • Anti-inflammatory
  • Antioxidant
  • Cardioprotective
  • Hepatoprotective
  • Immunomodulatory

 

Oyster Mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus)

In addition to having a lot of protein and nutrients, Oyster Mushrooms also have the following benefits:

  • Antimicrobial
  • Antidiabetic
  • Anti-inflammatory 
  • Antioxidant
  • Cardioprotective
  • Immunomodulatory
  • Promotes respiratory function

 

True Tinder Polypore (Fomes fomentarius)

Polypores have been a source of medication for centuries for various cultures. Some of its beneficial properties include the following:

  • Analgesic
  • Anti-inflammatory
  • Antioxidant
  • Immunomodulatory

 

Organic Myceliated Brown Rice

 

Mycelium is grown on non-fruiting bodies such as brown rice and afterward grounded into a powder. Not only do we obtain the effects of the fruited mushroom, but we also benefit from the grains the mycelium is grown on.

Moreover, mycelium-centered byproducts increase our immunity by stimulating white blood cells.

 

Optimized Triple Extraction Method

 

To achieve the most therapeutic benefit out of the mushrooms, a triple extraction method is utilized, consisting of: fermentation, hot water extraction and alcohol extraction.  Fermentation is, unfortunately, a very time-consuming process and is not often used; however, by fermenting the mushrooms first, it improves the bioavailability of the polysaccharides, alkaloids, and triterpenoids (or terpenes).  Conducting an extraction using hot water helps to break down the chitin walls, which humans lack the proper enzymes to degrade; this liberates more polysaccharides, particularly the beta-glucans. This process is finished with an alcohol extraction of at least 100 days in organic, USP grade alcohol.  The literature on the extraction of bioactive compounds from mushrooms indicates that these are the most effective methods, and by applying all three, it helps to ensure that individuals receive the full spectrum of beneficial properties.

 

Related: Benefits of Our Mushroom Tinctures

 

Importance of Organic, USP Grade Alcohol

 

a hand holding a tincture bottle

 

As discussed before, alcohol provides one of the best methods of extracting the bioactive compounds from medicinal mushrooms, particularly those which are not water-soluble. Moreover, it helps to preserve these compounds, for improved shelf life. While any alcohol can technically achieve this, to an extent, by using United State Pharmacopeia (USP) grade, organic alcohol purity can be further ensured.  

If one is taking a product to improve their health, why would they settle for a substandard delivery medium?

USP grade alcohol is required to meet or exceed strict, pharmaceutical-grade standards, at a proof of at least 190. By choosing organic, not only does it help ensure purity of the product, for the individual, but also demonstrates a dedication to supporting a sustainable environment. While all alcohol is technically organic in the chemical sense, organic alcohol refers specifically to alcohol derived from sources which meet the legal definitions of organic certification.

 

Our therapeutic mushroom tinctures are triple extracted and take 100 days to make to give you the quality and purity that you need. Learn more by browsing our selection of tinctures.

 

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Written by Jessica Davis